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The Dos and Don'ts of Managing Multiple Search Console Accounts


Managing Multiple Search Console
Managing Multiple Search Console

As digital footprints expand beyond regional boundaries, questions arise around properly structuring websites and properties in Google Search Console. Chief among them - can the same site be added to multiple accounts? While seemingly harmless, such duplicate submissions warrant careful consideration.


At face value, adding a website under two properties looks redundant. However, legitimate use cases do exist such as multi-lingual sites, localized micro-sites or split international/domestic properties. Correct configuration ensures search engines interpret structure and content accurately.


For multi-lingual websites, isolating each language beneath its own Search Console property using targetted metadata establishes proper indexing. Robots.txt blocks duplicate content crawl across properties while hreflang tags inform regional relevance. This separation prevents confusing algorithms evaluating translations.


Similarly, micro-sites focusing on certain international regions, services or specializations work well under a dedicated property each. Distinct sitemaps, metadata and content distinguish unique purposes to avoid duplicate content flags. Proper rel=canonical tagging resolves duplications where some overlap exists.


Advanced international SEO strategies sometimes endorse splitting a .com domain and international country-codes into separate properties for localized keyword targeting and linkage. However, this approach risks duplicate content issues if not properly segmented by language or geography at a folder level minimum.


Regardless of multi-property structure, avoiding total duplication remains crucial. Submitting something twice under the same or different properties misguides search engines assessingreindexing priority or canonical version identification. Always direct crawlers clearly through XML sitemaps and metadata.


While technically feasible to add a site or sections under two accounts, potential downsides outweigh benefits for most standard sites. Descriptive property/view naming assists Google associating duplicated presences, but maintaining separation becomes complex. Accidental issues may surface from differing property-level configurations not properly reconciled.


Instead, site architecture should follow clean conventions allowing both humans and algorithms comprehend relationships naturally. Consolidating under one property declutters signals when manageable, while language/region-specific splits enhance relevancy when structure permits clean isolation. Overall, keeping content distinctly unique across properties maintains simplicity.

So in summary - multi-lingual or geographically localized sites often benefit from discrete properties handled properly. However, redundant or duplicate submissions generally provide misleading signals confusing natural understanding. Maintain a tidy, coherent presence reflecting architecture for best assessment by search engines.


For those unsure about existing set-ups, consult Google's guidelines on property consolidation versus segmentation. Or perform testing by submitting removal requests and observing index changes if the same content shows under separate properties unexpectedly. Remember - refinement often outranks redundancy for search visibility in the long run.

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